We’re Retuning to Work!

At last !  The world is slowly reopening and employees are returning to work.  Everyone is excited about being out and about…especially business owners.  In all of the commotion, there’s a high probability that abundant changes are needed in the workplace.  In this blog, we’re offering ideas about how to enhance employee morale, strengthen customer service, and increase sales.   

Change your perspective

View “new normal” challenges as opportunities for growth and improvement.  Avoid approaching problems with a defeatist attitude.  Visualize how positive outcomes will help your firm thrive.  Then share your ideas with clients via social media and other communication outlets.

Get back to basics

Revisit soft skills basics such as effective communication, empathy, and positive attitudes.  Now is not the time to allow customer service to fall by the wayside; in fact, it’s time to double down on delivering an experience that is unique only to your brand.  Empathize with customers and maintain a positive mindset.

Communication is key.  Be upfront and honest with clients about what they should expect from the level of service you’ll deliver.  Keep them in the loop about policy changes.

Set realistic attainable expectations from your team.  Highlight  expectations in weekly staff huddles.  

If a project cost is going to run over due to price increases in raw materials, share this information with clients immediately.  Give as much information as possible to ensure an understanding that they’re not being overcharged.  

Let your customer know you appreciate their patience by writing personalized “thank you” notes, applying a customized postage stamp, and dropping it in the mail.

Products and Policies

Due to shifts in the marketplace, consider whether you should update your company’s policy or services.  Whether it’s a reduced staffing model or limited supplies, these “constraints” may require a change in how you conduct business.  Doing so may increase employee efficiency and customer satisfaction.

Let us know in the comments how your business is pivoting in the face of such challenges. 

Make it a great day!

The ‘People-Pleaser’ Personality at Work

To paraphrase Merriam-Webster, the act of people-pleasing is driven by a myriad of psychological motivators and saying “yes” when you really want to say “no”.

Here’s why people-pleasing is a detriment to your company’s growth:

* On the surface, a people-pleaser may give the appearance that all is well, however, he/she actually may be overwhelmed, stressed, and on the verge of burnout leading to costly errors and omissions which will evenutally impact the profit margin. 

* The tendency to give everything to others coupled with fear or disappointment will drive a people-pleaser to over-commit and land up falling short of meeting client expectations.

* Because they operate from a space of sacrifice, resentment can grow if management does not acknowledge their sacrifices or offer “acceptable levels of praise”.  

For these reasons, it is important for supervisors to pay careful attention to all employees’ non-verbal cues.   Make a point to be empathetic and to encourage employees to give self-care.  Foster a company culture that rewards extraordinary efforts for all employees.

A myriad of professionals have opined the answer to business success.  A sure answer to business failure is trying to please everybody.

Let’s talk.  We welcome your input for managing people-pleasers in the comment section below. 

In the meantime, make it a great day!

4 Tips for Post-Pandemic Workplace Etiquette

As many offices begin to re-open, workers can expect to be met with new safety protocols, open concept workspaces, and varying levels of comfortability in our world of the “new normal”.   As we adjust to these fresh starts, it is more important than ever to draw on our ability to empathize with others and maneuver workspaces with thoughtfulness.

Tip 1: Review Covid-19 Safety Protocols 

Policies and rules vary from business to business, so be sure to take note of all safety protocols provided by your employer prior to returning to the office.  Pack an extra mask so that you’re prepared for situations such as offsite client meetings that may fall under different protocols than your workplace.

Tip 2:  Avoid the “V” Topic

Returning to the office provides an opportunity to become reacquainted with colleagues and catch-up on life events.  Conversations can quickly turn to vaccination status and it should be avoided.  This is private medical information and intrusive inquiries are inappropriate.  Likewise the oversharing of vaccination information can also make people uncomfortable.

Tip 3: Leave Your Tchotchkes at Home

Many companies are moving to open concept workspaces with unassigned seating.  This can be a big adjustment for people who enjoy having all their creature comforts nearby.  Also, refrain from encroaching on temporarily unoccupied desks with your overflow. 

Tip 4: Embrace Meeting New Neighbors

These new open concept workspaces create a fluid community.  While some may prefer the routine of seeing the same faces everyday, open concept seating allows for new connections and communities to grow so it is likely you will have rotating workplace neighbors. 

Observing these general tips should help with the transition from remote work.  Be sensitive to the fact that everyone’s level of comfort will vary (respect one another’s boundaries).  Extend a bit of grace as we all continue to shift and pivot. 

We’d love to hear from you.  Please share your tips for transitioning from remote work in the comments below!

Make it a great day.

College Students: What You Should Know When Re-entering the Workplace

If you’ve been following our blog, you know we’ve devoted considerable attention to Emotional Intelligence (EI or EQ for Emotional Quotient) over the last few months.  

Emotional intelligence refers to a person’s ability to understand and articulate his/her own feelings as well as the feelings of others.  Those with high EQ have good self-regulation skills and understand how to empathize with the challenges that other people face.

As the world slowly returns to in-person workplace employment and face-to-face meetings, activities, and events, we want to help working college students feel confident about advocating for their own needs and how to understand complicated social and workplace scenarios.

As college students, you have many academic and extracurricular demands on you all of the time.  That said, your busy stressful academic/work-life should not lead to the neglect of your emotional well-being.

Daniel Goleman’s ground-breaking work in the 1990s explained the importance of EQ and defined its framework in terms of these five components:

  1. Self-awareness
  2. Self-regulation
  3. Motivation
  4. Empathy
  5. Social skills

Take an emotional intelligence test to help you reach your EQ goals.  Here’s a self-awareness exercise that you can conduct in your private time:

Set an alarm for various points during the day.  When the alarm goes off, stop what you’re doing and take an introspective look at how you’re feeling emotionally.  Do you feel anxious about an upcoming exam?  Do you feel that your current  status of life is lacking?   Are you comparing your circumstances to someone else’s?  Your anxiety may show up as physical irritation, a headache, or a sense of insecurity.  Perhaps you noticed you’ve been distracted from your academic or work assignments.

Meditation helps to improve your intuition and is an effective stress management tool.

Let us know in the comments section of this post if you took an introspective EQ test and if you like.  Above all, make it a great day!

Guest Post: Getting 1 Step Closer to Meeting Face-to-Face

Today’s blog is written by Tamika Brown, President and Chief Experience Officer of RSVP Premier Group LLC, a meeting, event, experiential marketing, incentive, concierge & lifestyle management company based in Troy, Michigan.  She is a contributing writer and has been featured in Michigan Meetings & Events Magazine, Meeting Planners International (MPI) Professional Magazine, Wedding Planner Magazine, and the DIY Television Network.  

Not sure about you but I have turned into a “Zombie” with all these online meetings and events.  As a planner who is accustomed to planning in-person events, the last year has proved to be quite challenging as it relates to determining which events can be reimagined in a virtual environment.  A survey conducted in the February Dashboard on PCMA.org suggests that other meeting planners and suppliers are finding the return of in-person events easier to see on the horizon and feeling less anxious about the future.   With safety measures such as rapid testing, venues commitment to cleanliness policies, the availability of on-site medical personnel, and other safety practices in place, we are getting one step closer to returning to face-to-face meetings.

Another important factor to consider as we prepare to return to meeting in-person is everyone involved (vendors, attendees, suppliers, etc.) must make a “personal accountability commitment” to keep not only themselves but everyone they come in contact with safe by adopting a multi-layer approach including wearing the appropriate 3-ply mask, social distancing, and taking the vaccine before attending large gatherings.

Looking forward to seeing you in person—soon.

Tamika

Tamika loves to write about event, experiential marketing, and providing solutions for customers face-to-face or in the digital arena.  You can connect with her on LinkedIn

Also, visit her awesome website at RSVP Premier Group LLC