Cancel Culture and Customer Service

According to Wikipedia.com, cancel culture is a form of “shunning or boycotting” an individual based on their egregious behavior or controversial statement. Undoubtedly you’ve heard of celebrities being “cancelled” and falling victim to cancel culture, but what about companies? Yes, companies have also gotten caught up in cancel culture. Look no further than your breakfast table and you’ll find examples of companies and brands such as Goya Foods, Aunt Jemima (Pearl Milling Co.), and Cream of Wheat that have recently faced such backlash.

Being prepared is a company’s best defense when it comes to cancel culture. First and foremost, hear your customer clearly and assess the gravity of the situation. Never underestimate the power and reach of social media. Baby boomers may mistakenly view social media as frivolous; however, it is important to actively monitor your social media for customer complaints. Addressing customer complaints quickly and properly is imperative. Using social media to solicit solutions from customers is a great way to show customers that you care and you’re listening.

Second, consider all the ways your message could be interpreted. This is one of the reasons diversity is important. Despite your intent, your message can be interpreted differently by others based on their life experiences and beliefs. Draw on your team’s diversity for feedback.

And finally, mistakes are bound to happen. But it is important to quickly address errors and accept responsibility. Offer an empathetic and genuine apology alongside your plan for improvement or prevention.

Now, let’s go out there and make it a great day!

Internal Communication Has Critical Impact on Business

Employees agreeing during meeting

Photo Provided by Pixaby

What’s one of the best ways to foster creativity and growth in the workplace?  Dismantling silos and building internal bridges.

Members of various corporate C-Suites are beginning to recognize that silos are a major factor that prevent companies from hitting growth and profit targets.  Not only that, they understand that silos are partially responsible for key employees not reaching their full potential and losing them to competitors.  

The term ‘silo’ has been used in the corporate arena for the last 30 years.  It is borrowed from what we know as farm silos which store grain for farmers.   When you look at farm silos, they have no windows, they have limited points of entrance, and in older silos, the grain cannot be easily extracted.  How ironic.  The instrument that is used to store a product to sell at a later date for profit is the same instrument that obstructs the full life and fervor of the farm.  The same is true when applied to companies.

Read more

Ask Clients About Obstacles

Obstacles to delivering exceptional service present themselves in a number of ways.  Remained unchecked, they’ll quickly become difficult challenges to hurdle—ultimately leading to poor sales and lean profit margins.

So, how does one overcome such hindrances?  One of the best ways is to ask clients a simple question:  “What obstacles prevent you from having great experiences with us?”.   Caution:  This is an open ended question that basically asks, “what are we doing wrong and how are we preventing you from doing more business with us?”.  Do NOT ask this question if you aren’t prepared to hear completely honest and hard answers.  Customers are eager to give their opinions; that said, their opinions may be offered in a manner in which you may not be ready to receive.  So, brace yourself.  Get ready.  Make a plan for change and implementation.

Make time for you and your team to work on fresh ideas about customer satisfaction.  Focus on typical customer irritations such as: Read more